Harbour Photography in Infrared around Scotland

July 10, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

Hi Everyone

Like a lot of businesses, as a professional freelance photographer who normally photographs events and corporate conferences around Edinburgh and throughout Scotland, in addition to fine art photography, I have had to look at fresh markets and projects during this difficult time.  However from a positive point of view, this has also enabled me to explore new ideas and extend existing initiatives that I previously had to delay due to lack of time.  I have always liked photographing harbours around Scotland, nothing new in that, I hear you say and you would be right, however, this time, I am only photographing them in infrared.  The harbours in question will all be located in Scotland and will include colour and infrared photos.  The harbours in infrared photos include: Dunbar, Port Seton, Eyemouth, Cove Bay, St Abbs, Crail and Skye.  The ones not located in East Lothian or the Borders were taken before lockdown.

So what considerations should I take into account when photographing harbours in infrared.  Here they are below, for what it’s worth:

1. The usual rules for infrared photography apply ie sunshine for the best photos, as near to mid-day as possible, although on one occasion it was foggy and I still managed a few good shots

2. Check the tides, the harbour will look totally different without water and when it is shallow

3. Try and go when there is a higher likelihood of boats, ie get to know when the fishermen go out

4. Try and get the old boats in the photo ie the ones with character that look great in Infrared

5. Clouds are great for harbour photos with a blue sky backdrop to give that infrared contrast that we all love

6. Don’t just photograph the boats, there are, seagulls, nets, ropes, engines and even seals and otters in some harbours.  I haven’t photographed an otter in a harbour yet, but I have managed a seal or two

7. Don’t stand too close to the edge and pay attention, I haven’t fallen in, but I did injure myself when I was concentrating too hard on the photo and not on the ground I front of me

8. Take a normal camera with you also, you may just catch a photo that needs conventional equipment

9. Don’t be frightened to include people now and again.  They will help to tell a story

10. Vary your angles and vantage points for something different.  You may want to be down at a low level or overlooking the harbour from above, but the main thing is to try and get something new and original

Hope this helps.

Until next time.

www.colinwrightphotography.co.uk

www.edinburghphotographer.com

 

 


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Commercial Freelance event and corporate Photographer, Edinburgh, Scotland

Fine Art and Landscape Photographer Scotland

www.colinwrightphotography.co.uk

[email protected]

 

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